Shot Clock Masters report

Golf

South African Justin Walters was Korhonen’s closest challenger on eight under standard in the wake of checking one birdie and a solitary intruder on day three.

Englishman David Horsey, Scotland’s Connor Syme and veteran Spaniard Miguel Angel Jimenez were among the extensive gathering in a tie for third on seven under.

Midway pioneer Korhonen achieved the turn in 33 in the wake of following up birdies at the first and third with another from six feet at the ninth.

The Finn at that point made it consecutive picks up with a birdie at the tenth to get to 13 under before securely parring the staying eight gaps.

Korhonen revealed to Sky Sports: “I generally love to come here and it is by all accounts functioning admirably this year.

“I will stay on course and execute it as well as can be expected, so how about we see.”

The current week’s competition is the first in proficient golf to time each shot from each player in the field.

Players have 50 seconds to take their shot on the off chance that they are first to play, including tee shots on par threes, or 40 seconds for tee shots on different openings or when second or third to play.

The initial two days passed by without a solitary time infringement yet there were three on Saturday, with Clemens Prader, Grant Forrest and Andrea Pavan all gave one-stroke punishments.

Day two report

Finland’s Mikko Korhonen will bring a thin lead into the third round of the debut Shot Clock Masters, where none of the field were punished for moderate play for the second day running.

Korhonen has not dropped a shot in 36 gaps in the wake of adding a 67 to his opening 68 at Diamond Country Club for a mostly aggregate of nine under standard, a shot in front of England’s Steve Webster and South African Justin Walters.

Spain’s Miguel Angel Jimenez had been four shots clear when he achieved 10 under standard, yet the 54-year-old dropped three shots in his last three gaps to complete seven under nearby home most loved Matthias Schwab, Ashun Wu and Jeppe Huldahl.

The current week’s occasion in Austria is the first in proficient golf to time each shot from every one of the 120 players in the field, with an advanced clock worked by an official mounted on a carriage which takes after each gathering.

Players have 50 seconds to take their shot on the off chance that they are first to play, including tee shots on par threes, or 40 seconds for tee shots on different openings or when second or third to play.

They confront a one-shot punishment for every awful time caused, yet none were given out as the players immediately adjusted to the exploratory configuration.

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